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Calendar of Events: September–November 2012

Calendar of Events: September–November 2012

Please Note: This program schedule is current as of August, 23 2012. Updates and Images can be downloaded at press.barnesfoundation.org


COLLECTION GALLERY
Permanent installation

Assembled by Dr. Albert C. Barnes between 1912 and 1951, the Barnes collection is renowned as one of the finest holdings of impressionist, post-impressionist, and early modern paintings in the world. In addition to numerous works by Renoir, Cézanne, Matisse, Picasso, Van Gogh and other modern and American masters, the collection includes important examples of African sculpture, Pennsylvania German decorative arts, Native American ceramics, old master paintings, as well as jewelry, textiles, and antiquities, presented together in their original “ensembles” in 24 beautifully lit, intimate rooms.

 

Timed ticket required for entry. Advance purchase highly recommended. www.barnesfoundation.org

Audio Guides are available for rental onsite for $5. The audio guide is also available for free download at www.barnesfoundation.org or from the App store on your phone or tablet.

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NOW ON VIEW IN THE EXHIBTION GALLERY
Through March 18, 2012
Ensemble: Albert C. Barnes and the Experiment in Education

Drawing on the Foundation’s rich archives, and other non-gallery collections, this textured exhibition charts Barnes’s history and important collaborations—with the likes of Leo Stein, William Glackens, John Dewey and Paul Guillaume—as he assembled his collection, established the Foundation and refined his aesthetic and educational theories. Free with admission

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FRIDAY NIGHTS AT THE BARNES
Every Friday 6–10 pm, a lively mix of music and programs from around the world. Cash bar and food for purchase. Access to programs and music is included with gallery admission but may be purchased separately at the door for $10 unless otherwise noted.

First Friday! September 7
First Fridays are generously sponsored by Wells Fargo

6-8 pm
Musical Performance by Relâche
The Planets, combining live music by Kyle Gann and video by John Sanborn, performed by Relâche. Free with admission

6:30–7:30 pm 
A New Chapter in the Story of the Parkway (lecture and discussion)
The arrival of the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia is the latest chapter in its storied history. Conceived after the Civil War in conjunction with the creation of Fairmount Park, the Benjamin Franklin Parkway has reflected the changing needs and aspirations of Philadelphians. Art historian David Brownlee, Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor at the University of Pennsylvania and author of The Barnes Foundation: Two Buildings, One Mission (2012), surveys the history of this great civic boulevard. Architect and scholar Grace Ong Yan leads an audience discussion of its past and future. $15; $12 for members

7:30–8:30 pm
Beer Tasting and Art Exploration
Sample the subtleties of American craft beers and compare nuances of flavor, scent, and region with formal and sensory aspects of masterworks in the Barnes Foundation.  John Gatti, instructor of art and aesthetics, leads the art discussion. Registration required $40; $30 for members

Friday, September 14
6–8 pm
LUX
A performance by LUX (Lincoln University Express) includes traditional jazz of the 1940s, as well as contemporary sounds, including smooth R&B. Free with admission

6:30–7:30 pm
Conversations with the Collection: Marsden Hartley
Painter Marsden Hartley is the focus of a conversation between Mark D. Mitchell, associate curator of American art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, watercolorist Sherman Fleming, and muralist Meg Saligman. Part of a series in which scholars and artists discuss aspects of the Barnes. $15; $12 for members

Friday, September 21
6–8 pm
The Mike Boone Quartet
The Philadelphia Inquirer named him the “backbone of a thousand gigs” and “one of the mainstays of the Philly Jazz scene”. Philly’s own veteran Bassist, Mike Boone, has played for notables as Buddy Rich, Mose Allison and Ben Vereen. Free with admission

6:30 pm–8 pm
Shakespeare in Translation: Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre 
An evening of live performances, audience participation, and discussions focuses on Shakespeare's The Tempest and Aimé Césaire's Une Tempête, its famous adaptation for the African diaspora. Working with gifted multilingual actors, Katherine Rowe, professor of English at Bryn Mawr College, explores the conversation between the two plays. $30; $20 for members

8:30–9:30 pm
Orchestra 2001: John Cage Centennial Happening
In a happening (Cage’s term for a concert event blurring the usual stage-audience relationship), Orchestra 2001 presents compositions by Cage (1912–1992), including pieces for string, keyboard, brass, and percussion instruments, as well as works for solo voice from the “Song Books.” $30; $20 for members. Rain date: Friday, September 28

Friday, September 28
6–8 pm
Oscuro Quintet
Philadelphia's first tango music ensemble, Alban Bailly (guitar), Thomas Lee (piano), Shinjoo Cho (accordion), June Bender (violin), and Ben Blazer (bass), investigates tango’s traditions suggests its future. Free with admission

First Friday! October 5
First Fridays are generously sponsored by Wells Fargo
6-8 pm
Wayna
A performance by Ethiopian-born, chart-topping, indie standout Wayna, who wows audiences and critics with her renditions of R&B and neo-soul and garnered a coveted 2009 Grammy nomination in the Best Urban/Alternative Performance category. Free with admission

6-6:45 pm Panel discussion, 7-9:30 pm screening
Film:  Lady Sings the Blues
The Greater Philadelphia Film Office (GPFO), in partnership with AfroTaino Productions, presents a 40th-anniversary screening of the Oscar-nominated film Lady Sings the Blues (1972) about jazz singer Billie Holiday. GPFO hosts a panel discussion highlighting the film’s impact, both in-front of and behind the camera, and examining diversity in the film industry today. 1972, directed by Sidney J. Furie, 144 minutes. Free with admission

6:30–7:30 pm
The Parkway Campus: A Horticultural History
The plantings at the Barnes Foundation’s Philadelphia site were chosen for aesthetic, functional, and historical reasons, including their connections to the arboretum and gardens at the Foundation’s campus at Merion, PA. These connections and the history of the downtown site are the subject of a talk by Drew Lehrian, head gardener, and Katy Rawdon, director of archives, libraries, and special collections. $12; $10 for members

Friday, October 19
6–8 pm
Paul Jost and the Modern Rock Ensemble
The Modern Rock Ensemble, featuring vibraphonist Tony Miceli, explores music of the ‘60s, including Led Zeppelin, the Beatles, and Aerosmith, in a jazz setting. Performing with Tony Miceli are Paul Jost (vocals), Kevin MacConnell (bass) and Charlie Patierno (drums). Free with admission

6:30–8 pm
Magic and Macbeth: Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre
An evening of live performances, audience participation, and discussions focuses on the three witches of Shakespeare's Macbeth, in which they are called many things, including "secret hags" and "weird sisters," but almost never "witches.” Looking closely at the text, as well as at performances dating back to the 1660s, Widener Professor,  Dr. Annalisa Castaldo leads the discussion and investigates Shakespeare’s experiments with gender, magic, and audience assumptions. $30; $20 for members

Friday, October, 26
6–8 pm 
Venissa Santi: Afro-Cuban Jazz
Multilingual Cuban-American vocalist represents the 21st century’s new breed of vocalists. Santi sings an exciting blend of American and Cuban standards, folkloric songs, and original compositions that reflect influences ranging from Billie Holliday and Betty Carter to Celia Cruz. Free with admission

Friday, October 26
6:30–7:30 pm
Opera Company of Philadelphia: La Bohème highlights
In honor of National Opera Week (October 26–November 4, 2012), Soprano Michelle Johnson and baritone Troy Cook join pianist Laura Ward in a recital of operatic favorites, classical song, and treasured American standards. Two tickets to an upcoming OCP production will be raffled at the event. Free with admission

First Friday! November 2
First Fridays are generously sponsored by Wells Fargo
6-7 pm
Jeremy Dyen and PhillyBloco’s Michael Stevens
A mix of rock and samba to warm up the fall evening. Free with admission

6:30–7:30 pm
Bee-Keeping, Urban Farming, and Sustainability
A discussion of community gardens, the regional food system, and the honeybee’s impact on agriculture, by Cricket Brien of LUSH Landscape Architecture and chair of the Barnes Foundation’s Arboretum Advisory Committee, Haile Johnston, co-founder and co-director of Common Market, and Don Shump, owner of the Philadelphia Bee Co. $15; $12 for members

7:30–8:30 pm
The Two Alberts
Albert Barnes understood the significance of conservation and preservation. With Albert Nulty, whom he hired in 1917, he created a conservation program for the Barnes Foundation’s collection. Senior Director of Conservation and Chief Conservator of Paintings Barbara Buckley talks about its early history. $12; $10 for members

8:30–9:30 pm
PhillyBloco
PhillyBloco sets a raucous mashup of samba, funk, reggae, and more, to irresistible Brazilian carnival rhythms. Free with admission

Friday, November 9
6–8 pm
Lisa Chavous Quintet
A memorable evening of jazz by Lisa Chavous, known for her energetic performances of jazz, blues, and soul. Free with Admission

Friday, November 16
6–8 pm
Najwa Parkins: The After Hours Trio + One
The After Hours Trio + One is a Philadelphia-based jazz quartet with a distinctive sound. Najwa Parkins sings, while Luke Brandon (trumpet), Dan Hanrahan (guitar), and Justin Sekelewski (bass) play arrangements of jazz standards and original compositions. Free with Admission

Friday, November 16
6:30–8 pm
Shakespeare from Around the World: Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre
An evening of live performance, audience participa­tion, and discussion focuses on Shakespeare as a global phenomenon, whose plays are continually adapted and re-imagined for contexts far removed from Renaissance England. Dennis Austin Britton, assistant professor of English at the University of New Hampshire, leads the discussion. $30; $20 for members

Friday, November 23
6–8 pm
The Robin Work Ensemble
Vocal sensation Robin Work has been singing profes­sionally for over 30 years and has performed throughout the eastern United States and Canada, in musical genres ranging from pop to big band to jazz. Accompanists are Tony Miceli (vibraphone) and Kevin MacConnell (bass). Free with Admission

Friday, November 30
6–8 pm
Power of Ten
Power of Ten, Philadelphia’s concert jazz ensemble, performs music that ranges from remixes of the Beatles and Carole King to new renditions of classical music and original mainstream jazz. Free with Admission

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OTHER PERFORMANCES

Wednesday, October 17 
10:30 am–12 pm
Tempesta di Mare: Adam Pearl, Harpsichord
In the first in a series of three concerts at the Barnes by Tempesta di Mare, Philadelphia’s baroque orchestra, harpsichordist Adam Pearl performs a program that includes a solo suite by Johann Sebastian Bach, dances by Jean-Henri d'Anglebert, and solos by Jacques Duphly. Mr. Pearl has performed with Tempesta di Mare since 2004 and teaches at the Peabody Conservatory. Two further performances are scheduled for January and May, 2013. $36; $18 for members. Includes noon admission to the Collection Gallery. 

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THEATRE

Friday, September 21
6:30–8 pm
Shakespeare in Translation: Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre 
An evening of live performances, audience participation, and discussions focuses on Shakespeare's The Tempest and Aimé Césaire's Une Tempête, its famous adaptation for the African diaspora. Working with gifted multilingual actors, Katherine Rowe, professor of English at Bryn Mawr College, explores the conversation between the two plays. $30; $20 for members

Friday, October 19

6:30–8 pm
Magic and Macbeth: Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre
An evening of live performances, audience participation, and discussions focuses on the three witches of Shakespeare's Macbeth, in which they are called many things, including "secret hags" and "weird sisters," but almost never "witches.” Looking closely at the text, as well as at performances dating back to the 1660s, Widener Professor,  Dr. Annalisa Castaldo leads the discussion and investigates Shakespeare’s experiments with gender, magic, and audience assumptions. $30; $20 for members

Friday, November 16
6:30–8 pm
Shakespeare from Around the World: Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre
An evening of live performance, audience participa­tion, and discussion focuses on Shakespeare as a global phenomenon, whose plays are continually adapted and re-imagined for contexts far removed from Renaissance England. Dennis Austin Britton, assistant professor of English at the University of New Hampshire, leads the discussion. $30; $20 for members

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FILM

Friday, October 5 (Part of First Friday! Sponsored by Wells Fargo)
6-6:45 pm Panel discussion, 7-9:30 pm screening
Film:  Lady Sings the Blues
The Greater Philadelphia Film Office (GPFO), in partnership with AfroTaino Productions, presents a 40th-anniversary screening of the Oscar-nominated film Lady Sings the Blues (1972) about jazz singer Billie Holiday. GPFO hosts a panel discussion highlighting the film’s impact, both in-front of and behind the camera, and examining diversity in the film industry today. 1972, directed by Sidney J. Furie, 144 minutes. Free with admission

Wednesday, September 5 (Part of ArtKids @ the Movies)
4-6 pm
Film: Ratatouille
In one of Paris’s finest restaurants, Remy, a determined young rat, dreams of becoming a renowned French chef. Presented in conjunction with the Cinémathèque Internationale of Philadelphia. Directed by Brad Bird and Jan Pinkava. 144 minutes. Best for ages 6–12 and their caregivers. -0Free. Space is limited. Reservations required: Admission to the Collection Gallery is not included.

 

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LECTURES AND CONVERSATIONS

Friday, September 7 (part of First Friday! Sponsored by Wells Fargo)
6:30–7:30 pm  
A New Chapter in the Story of the Parkway (lecture and discussion)
The arrival of the Barnes Foundation on Philadelphia’s Benjamin Franklin Parkway is the latest chapter in its history. Conceived after the Civil War in conjunction with the creation of Fairmount Park, built during the first two decades of the 20th century as an example of the City Beautiful movement, and gradually populated with buildings, the Benjamin Franklin Parkway tells the story of the changing needs and aspirations of Philadelphians. Art historian David Brownlee, Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor at the University of Pennsylvania and author of The Barnes Foundation: Two Buildings, One Mission (2012), surveys the history of this great civic boulevard. Architect and scholar Grace Ong Yan leads an audience discussion of its past and future. $15; $12 for members

Thursday, September 13
10:30–11:30 am
Shakespeare Reading Group: Hamlet
An interactive reading series hosted by the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre. Participants read aloud and discuss characters, language, and plot. Free with Admission

Friday, September 14
6:30–7:30 pm
Conversations with the Collection: Marsden Hartley
Painter Marsden Hartley is the focus of a conversation between Mark D. Mitchell, associate curator of American art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, watercolorist Sherman Fleming, and muralist Meg Saligman. Part of a series in which scholars and artists discuss aspects of the Barnes. $15; $12 for members

Saturday, September 15
10:30–11:30 am
Building Two Buildings for the Barnes: David Brownlee, Lecture and Book Signing
The Barnes Foundation collection’s first home, completed in 1925 in Merion, PA. was the product of the often stormy collaboration of Albert Barnes and architect Paul Cret. In designing the new Barnes building in Philadelphia, Tod Williams and Billie Tsien had to meet challenging legal requirements and the ambitious expectations of the Foundation’s leaders. Architectural historian David Brownlee is Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor at the University of Pennsylvania and the author of The Barnes Foundation: Two Buildings, One Mission (2012). Member-only event. $12

Friday, October 5 (Part of First Friday! Sponsored by Wells Fargo)
6:30–7:30 pm
The Parkway Campus: A Horticultural History
The plantings at the Barnes Foundation’s Philadelphia site were chosen for aesthetic, functional, and historical reasons, including their connections to the arboretum and gardens at the Foundation’s campus at Merion, PA. These connections and the history of the Center City site are the subject of a talk by Drew Lehrian, head gardener, and Katy Rawdon, director of archives, libraries, and special collections. $12; $10 for members

Thursday, October 11
10:30–11:30 am
Shakespeare Reading Group: Hamlet
An interactive reading series hosted by the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre. Participants read aloud and discuss characters, language, and plot. Free with Admission

Thursday, October 18
10:30–11:30 am
Why We Love to Hate Renoir: Martha Lucy, Lecture and Book Signing
Pierre-Auguste Renoir is among the world's most popular artists, and Albert C. Barnes collected his work obsessively. Yet Renoir is often the subject of ridicule; one critic wrote that "Renoir may be the worst artist ever to achieve canonical status." What is it about Renoir's art that inspires such harsh criticism, such mixed reactions? Dr. Lucy, author of Renoir in the Barnes Foundation (2012), ponders these and other questions. Member-only event. $12

Tuesday, October 23
8 am–2 pm
Master Class Workshop. Fall Is for Photographs: Lessons from a Pro
Professional garden photographer Rob Cardillo teaches beginners and seasoned photographers about creating dramatic vistas and floral portraits. After his lecture, students head into the gardens to capture their own. A critique follows lunch. Bring your digital camera, lenses, charged battery, storage cards, and tripod, if desired, plus lunch. If you have one, bring a laptop with software to download and edit images. If not, bring a selection of your favorite garden photos. $100; $90 for members and for Pennsylvania Horticultural Society members. Registration is required: pennhort.net/event registration or 215.988.8869. Takes place at Merion.

Friday, November 2 (Part of First Friday! Sponsored by Wells Fargo)
6:30–7:30 pm
Bee-Keeping, Urban Farming, and Sustainability
A discussion of community gardens, the regional food system, and the honeybee’s impact on agriculture, by Cricket Brien of LUSH Landscape Architecture and chair of the Barnes Foundation’s Arboretum Advisory Committee, Haile Johnston, co-founder and co-director of Common Market, and Don Shump, owner of the Philadelphia Bee Co. $15; $12 for members

Wednesday, November 7
10:30–11:30 am
Greening of the Barnes: William McDowell
The Barnes Foundation is on track to be the first major cultural institution to receive LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) platinum certification. William McDowell, senior building project executive, discusses features of the new building behind its high rating. The rating system was devised by the United States Green Building Council to evaluate the environ­mental performance of buildings. Members-only event. $12

Thursday, November 8
10:30–11:30 am
Shakespeare Reading Group: Hamlet
An interactive reading series hosted by the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre. Participants read aloud and discuss characters, language, and plot. Free with Admission

Wednesday, November 14
1–2:30 pm
A Focus on Fall Color
In a tour of the Barnes grounds at Merion, experts explain the science of fall color, point out other autumnal delights, and tell you what you should be doing in your own garden at this time of year. $23; members and Pennsylvania Horticultural Society members $18. Registration required. Takes place at Merion.

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WORKSHOPS

Barnes Architecture: Old and New
Tuesday, October 23, 12–2 pm
Instructors Grace Ong Yan and John Gatti
The Barnes Foundation has been a catalyst for great architecture, as seen in both the 1922 Paul Philippe Cret design for Merion and the 2012 Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia. This workshop explores the old and new architecture of the Barnes Foundation, inside and out. This workshop offers a first-hand experience of the new Barnes Foundation building design. Dr. Grace Ong Yan, involved in the selection process for architect, discusses the built expression of the architects’ “gallery in a garden” design. The significant contributions of both old and new buildings to architectural discourse will also be discussed. $50; members $45. To register call 215-278-7300

 

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FAMILY PROGRAMS
A delightful way for children and adults to enjoy art and art-making together.

ArtSee Activities Drop-in Programs
A delightful way for children and adults to enjoy art and art-making together. Best for children ages 6-12 and their caregivers. Free. Space is limited. Reservations required: Admission to the Collection Gallery is not included. Tickets available on-site.

September: Awesome Architecture
Friday, September 21, 5–7 pm
Saturday, September 22, 11 am–1 pm
Sunday, September 23, 1–3 pm
What a building! After observing and sketching the fascinating architectural details, construct your own Collection Diorama and design your own Barnes Building Bag. Free with admission. Free program tickets are also available on-site. Program tickets do not include admission to the Collection Gallery.

 

October: Game On!
Friday, October 19, 5–7 pm
Saturday, October 20, 11 am–1 pm
Sunday, October 21, 1–3 pm
Hoops, balls, cards, and races…there are so many paintings that feature games and sports of all sorts! Decorate your own Amazing Maze, Super Game Card, and Game On Bag. Free with admission. Free program tickets are also available on-site. Program tickets do not include admission to the Collection Gallery.

 

November: Native American Arts and Crafts
Friday, November 16, 5–7 pm
Saturday, November 17, 11 am–1 pm
Sunday, November 18, 1–3 pm
Celebrate Native American Heritage Month. Design your own special crafts inspired by pots and rugs on view. Free program tickets are also available on-site. Program tickets do not include admission to the Collection Gallery.
 

ARTime Storytime
Thursdays 10:30-11 am (with the exception of Thanksgiving, November 22)

Listen, dance, create, and sing to the art of Cezanne, Matisse, Picasso, Renoir, van Gogh, and other artists in the collection. Best for children ages 3–5 and their caregivers. Free. Space is limited. Reservations required:  Admission to the Collection Gallery is not included. Tickets available on-site.

 

Texture Tales
Thursday, September 6 and 13, 10:30 -11 am
Nibble Nibble by Margaret Wise Brown. Delightful poems and charming illustrations by Wendell Minor capture the whimsy of bunnies at play. 

Follow that Line
Thursday, September 20 and 27, 10:30 -11 am
The Painter by Peter Catalanotto. A moving and lyrical celebration of creativity, family connections, and the artful process.

Colorful Quest
Thursday, October 4 and 11, 10:30 -11 am
My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss. A dazzling assortment of colors and animals and Dr. Seuss’s bouncing rhymes.

Sounds in Space
Thursday, October 18 and 25, 10:30 -11 am
The Ear Book by Al Perkins. A close-up look at sounds we hear and sounds we imagine.

Colorful Quest
Thursday, November 1 and 8, 10:30 -11 am
The Color Kittens by Margaret Wise Brown. Once there were two color kittens with green eyes, Brush and Hush. . . 

Follow that Line
Thursday, November 15 and 29, 10:30 -11 am
Yip! Snap! Yap! by Charles Fuge. An irresistible collection of canine characters, each doing its own doggy thing.

 

ARTime Pajama Tourtime

Every 3rd Friday, 6–6:30 pm
An entertaining exploration of the galleries for children 5 and under and their caregivers.
Free with Collection Gallery Admission. Space is limited. Reservations required. Tickets available on-site.

House Hunt
Friday, September 21, 6-6:30 pm
Hunt for the paintings with jiggly houses, mighty castles, and funny farmhouses.

Playing Together
Friday, October 19, 6-6:30 pm
Find the playful pictures of family and friends. 

Shapes and Snakes
Friday, November 16, 6-6:30 pm
Explore the artful shapes and discover the snakes.

 

ArtKids @ the Movies

1st Wednesdays, 4–6 pm
An exciting assortment of international and American films that relate to the Barnes collection. From feature films to animated shorts, there is always something new to see and discover. Best for ages 6–12 and their caregivers. Free. Space is limited. Reservations required: Admission to the Collection Gallery is not included. Tickets available on-site.

Ratatouille
Wednesday, September 5, 4-6 pm
In one of Paris’s finest restaurants, Remy, a determined young rat, dreams of becoming a renowned French chef.

To Be Announced Soon:
October 3
November 7
December 5

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PUBLIC HOURS AND ADMISSION PRICES:

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday, Sunday: 10 am–6 pm, Friday until 10 pm
Closed Tuesdays

Advance reservations strongly advised. Tickets are free to Members and children under the age of six accompanied by an adult. General admission prices are $18 adults, $15 seniors, $10 students. Admission on the first Sunday each month from 1 - 5 pm is free through the generosity of PECO. Information and tickets are available online at www.barnesfoundation.org and by calling 866.849.7056.

 

PARKING

Parking Lot
The Barnes Foundation parking lot is accessible from Pennsylvania Avenue between 20th and 21st Streets. Parking is on a first-come, first-served basis and cannot be reserved in advance. Parking tickets can be validated at the Guest Services Center or in the lobby. A membership card must be shown at the time of validation to receive member parking rates.

Visitors: $15 for up to 4 hours; $5 each additional hour Members: $12 for up to 4 hours; $5 each additional hour

Valet Parking
Valet parking is available in the car and taxi drop-off area on 20th Street between the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and Pennsylvania Avenue. Valet services are offered during operating hours.

Visitors: $30 for up to 4 hours; $5 each additional hour Members: $25 for up to 4 hours; $5 each additional hour

 

DINING AT THE BARNES FOUNDATION

Dining Options

The Barnes is pleased to offer two dining options for members and guests. Members receive a 10% discount at both the Garden Restaurant and the Coffee Bar.

Garden Restaurant

The modern, light-filled, sit-down restaurant offers a seasonal à la carte menu of hot and cold entrées, salads, and desserts, as well as a wine list featuring an array of local, domestic, and international wines, and a variety of specialty cocktails. On Friday nights light fare and a special martini menu are offered. Courtyard dining is available seasonally.

 

The Garden Restaurant is open to Barnes Foundation visitors and members on a first-come, first-served basis. Reservations are not accepted. All major credit cards are welcomed.

Garden Restaurant Hours

Monday:

10:30 am-5 pm

Tuesday:

Closed

Wednesday:

10:30 am-5 pm

Thursday:

10:30 am-5 pm

Friday:

10:30 am-8:30 pm

Saturday:

10:30 am-5 pm

Sunday:

10:30 am-5 pm

The Coffee Bar

The new Coffee Bar offers a casual, family-friendly, on-the-go menu featuring sandwiches, salads, snacks, desserts, cold beverages, and coffee. The bar is located on the Lower Level adjacent to the three-story, open-air interior garden. Open to Barnes Foundation visitors and members on a first-come, first-served basis. Reservations are not accepted. All major credit cards are welcomed.

Coffee Bar Hours

Monday:

9:30 am-5:30 pm

Tuesday:

Closed

Wednesday:

9:30 am-5:30 pm

Thursday:

9:30 am-5:30 pm

Friday:

9:30 am-9 pm

Saturday:

9:30 am-5:30 pm

Sunday:

9:30 am-5:30 pm

 

ABOUT THE BARNES FOUNDATION

The Barnes Foundation (barnesfoundation.org) was established by Albert C. Barnes in 1922 to “promote the advancement of education and the appreciation of the fine arts and horticulture.” The Barnes holds one of the finest collections of Post-Impressionist and early Modern paintings, with extensive holdings by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paul Cézanne, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Henri Rousseau, Amedeo Modigliani, Chaim Soutine and Giorgio de Chirico, as well as American masters Charles Demuth, William Glackens, Horace Pippin and Maurice Prendergast, Old Master paintings, important examples of African sculpture and Native American ceramics, jewelry and textiles, American paintings and decorative arts and antiquities from the Mediterranean region and Asia. The Barnes Foundation’s Art and Aesthetics programs engage a diverse array of audiences. These programs, occurring at the Philadelphia campus, online, and in Philadelphia communities, advance the mission through progressive, experimental and interdisciplinary teaching and learning.

The Barnes Arboretum, located at the Merion campus, contains more than 2,000 species/varieties of trees and woody plants, many of them rare. Founded in the 1880s by Joseph Lapsley Wilson and subsequently added to under the direction of Mrs. Laura L. Barnes, the collection includes a fern-leaf beech (Fagus sylvatica ‘Laciniata’), a dove tree (Davidia involucrata), a monkey-puzzle tree (Araucaria araucana), and a redwood (Sequoia sempervirens). Other important plant collections include Lilacs, Peonies, Stewartias and Magnolias. The Horticulture school at the Barnes Foundation in Merion has offered a comprehensive, three year certificate course of study in the botanical sciences, horticultural practices, garden aesthetics, and design through a well-grounded, scientific learning experience since its inception in 1940 by Mrs. Barnes.

 

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For more information
Jan Rothschild, Senior Vice President for Communications
Andrew Stewart, Director of Public Relations
215.278.7160, press@barnesfoundation.org

Online Press Office: http://press.barnesfoundation.org

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