THE BARNES FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES PROGRAMS AND EVENTS: September – December 2015

THE BARNES FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES PROGRAMS AND EVENTS: September – December 2015

Please note: this program schedule is current as of September 2015. Updates and images can be downloaded at: press.barnesfoundation.org
 

Permanent Collection

Continuous View

Assembled by Dr. Albert C. Barnes between 1912 and 1951, the Barnes collection is renowned as one of the finest holdings of Post-Impressionist and early Modern paintings in the world. The collection also includes important examples of African sculpture, early twentieth-century American painting, Pennsylvania German decorative arts, Native American ceramics, old master paintings, as well as metalwork, jewelry, textiles, and antiquities.

Among its major holdings are: 181 works by Pierre-Auguste Renoir (the largest single group of the artist’s paintings); 69 works by Paul Cézanne; 59 works by Henri Matisse; 46 works by Pablo Picasso; 16 works by Amedeo Modigliani; important paintings by Vincent Van Gogh and Georges Seurat; and 125 African sculptures, masks and tools.

 

Exhibitions

Strength and Splendor: Wrought Iron from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen
September 19, 2015– January 4, 2016
Press Preview: Tuesday, September 15

Strength and Splendor: Wrought Iron from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles presents approximately 150 magnificent wrought iron objects—including door knockers, jewelry, escutcheons, locks and keys, plaques, signs, strongboxes, and tools—that combine technological innovation with virtuoso artistry from the comprehensive holdings of the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles in Rouen, France. The exhibition complements the 887 pieces of European and American wrought iron that punctuate the Barnes Foundation’s signature wall arrangements of old master and modern paintings, and offers visitors the unique opportunity to experience a collection that Dr. Barnes likely knew and visited. This is the first time that the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles has sent an exhibition of its celebrated masterworks to the United States.

Dr. Barnes underscored the formal affinities that the wrought iron in his collection shared with the “motives and arabesques” in the paintings. Often, he combined disparate objects—shoe buckles and door hinges, ladles and hasps—to create new forms. In a 1942 letter to the American artist Stuart Davis, Barnes noted that the anonymous craftsman of such functional items was “just as authentic an artist as a Titian, Renoir, or Cézanne.”

Ranging in date from the Middle Ages to the early 20th-century, the objects from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles’s collection reveal iron as unexpectedly versatile, with its capacity to convey both masculine heft and an impossibly fragile delicacy that is hard to square with its industrial image. Objects ennobled with silver and gold inlays show iron as more than base metal. There are locks that represent their own function, for example, such as one with a built-in faithful guard dog and one with spring-loaded trap ready to catch a lock-pick. Others show a more whimsical side: an 18th-century sign in the shape of a greyhound that looks like something Calder might have made two centuries later, and a bat-shaped light.

Strength and Splendor: Wrought Iron from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen will be accompanied by a catalogue featuring an essay on Dr. Barnes’s practice of collecting of metalwork, one on the collection at the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, short essays on groups of works, and an illustrated glossary of technical terms.

Strength and Splendor: Wrought Iron from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen is sponsored by

 

Morgan Stanley
The contributing sponsor is

Comcast
With generous funding from the William Penn Foundation.

This project is supported in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

NEA

Additional support for Strength and Splendor: Wrought Iron from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen is provided by the Jill and Sheldon Bonovitz Exhibition Fund.


Ellen Harvey: Metal Painting
September 19, 2015– January 4, 2016
Press Preview: Tuesday, September 15

The Barnes Foundation’s fourth visual arts commission of 2015, Metal Paintingis composed of more than 800 oil paintings on magnetized panels of varying sizes installed as a large-scale collage on a steel wall. Harvey has painted each piece of metalwork in the Barnes collection as a metallic silhouette. Invoking Barnes’s celebration of the wrought iron collection for its formal values, she distills the essence of these objects, emphasizing their shapes.

Both exhibitions are curated by Judith F. Dolkart, the Mary Stripp & R. Crosby Kemper Director of the Addison Gallery of American Art at Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, and former Deputy Director of Art and Archival Collections and Gund Family Chief Curator at the Barnes Foundation. Anne-Charlotte Cathelineau, curator in charge of the objets d’art at the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, selected the objects included in Strength and Splendor and authored the catalogue’s essay on the holdings in Rouen, as well as several entries on individual objects.

“When Dr. Barnes first installed his now iconic wrought iron collection on the gallery walls, he divorced the objects from their functions and celebrated them for their formal properties—the ways in which they underscored forms in the paintings and other objects” says Dolkart. “With Strength and Splendor, we are able to re-contextualize the magnificent objects of Le Secq Destournelles’s collection. Ellen Harvey’s Metal Painting recombines the forms of the wrought iron in the Barnes collection, creating a new kind of ensemble or arrangement.” 

Support for Ellen Harvey: Metal Painting is also provided by John H. McFadden and Lisa D. Kabnick.


Picasso: The Great War, Experimentation and Change
February 21– May 9, 2016
Press Preview: Tuesday, February 16

The Barnes Foundation, in partnership with the Columbus Museum of Art, Ohio, premieres Picasso: The Great War, Experimentation and Change. On view February 21 through May 9, 2016 at the Barnes, the exhibition will then travel to the Columbus Museum of Art in June. Curated by Simonetta Fraquelli, an independent curator and specialist in early twentieth-century European art, the exhibition explores Pablo Picasso’s work between 1912 and 1924, highlighting the tumultuous years of the First World War, when the artist alternated between cubist and classical modes in his art. 

Inspired by the Columbus Museum of Art’s Picasso Still Life with Compote and Glass, 1914-15 and the Barnes’s extensive Picasso holdings, Picasso: The Great War, Experimentation and Change features some 50 works by Picasso drawn from major American and European museums and private collections. The show includes oil paintings, watercolors, drawings, and four costumes the artist designed for the avant-garde ballet, Parade, in 1917. Some 15 other important canvases by Picasso’s contemporaries—including Henri Matisse, Fernand Léger, and Diego Rivera—will also be presented.

“A radical shift occurred in Picasso’s work in 1914,” notes curator Simonetta Fraquelli. “Following seven years of refining the visual language of cubism, he began to introduce elements of naturalism to his work.” This change in his production can be viewed against the backdrop of an unsteady cultural climate in Paris during World War I.  Many people identified the fragmented forms of cubism with the German enemy and therefore perceived it as unpatriotic. This negative impression reverberated throughout Paris during the First World War and may have been a factor in Picasso’s shift in styles. However, Fraquelli states, “What becomes evident when looking at Picasso’s work between 1914 and 1924, is that his two artistic styles—Cubism and Neoclassicism—are not antithetical; on the contrary, each informs the other, to the degree that the metamorphosis from one style to the other is so natural for the artist that occasionally they occur in the same works of art.”

Included in the exhibition will be major works from the Picasso museums in Barcelona, Málaga, andParis, including, respectively: Woman with a Mantilla (Fatma), oil and charcoal on canvas, 1917; Olga Kholklova with a Mantilla, oil on canvas, 1917; and Femme Assise, oil on canvas, 1920. 

The exhibition also features four costumes that Picasso designed for the avant-garde ballet, Parade, which premiered in Paris in 1917. These are: Costume for Chinese Conjurer (original), and reproductions of The American Manager, The French Manager, and The Horse. Performed by Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, with music by Erik Satie, story by Jean Cocteau and the choreography of Léonide Massine, Parade was the first cross-disciplinary collaboration of its kind. The ballet, which tells the story of an itinerant theater group performing a sideshow, or a parade, was viewed as a revolutionary approach to theater. Picasso was the first avant-garde artist involved in such a production – not only designing the costumes, but also the theater curtain and set. Included in the exhibition will be a watercolor and graphite sketch of the curtain design, and a pencil sketch of the Costume for Chinese Conjurer. Picasso drew inspiration for his designs from the modern world – everything from circuses and carousels, to music halls and the cinema. With Picasso’s inventive, geometric costumes and naturalistic curtain design, Parade can be seen as the ultimate fusion of cubist and classical forms.

Picasso’s juxtaposition of figurative and cubist techniques can be seen as an expression of artistic freedom during a time of great conflict, and his shifts in style became a means of not repeating, in his words, “the same vision, the same technique, the same formula.” The works by Picasso’s contemporaries, such as Diego Rivera’s Still Life with Bread Knife from 1915 and Henri Matisse’s Lorette in a Red Jacket from 1917, offer further insight into the shifting cultural climate in France during this transformative period.

Managing Curator for Picasso: The Great War, Experimentation and Change at the Barnes Foundation is Martha Lucy. Managing Curator at the Columbus Museum of Art is Chief Curator, David Stark.

Tickets for Picasso: The Great War, Experimentation and Change are now available for purchase. This exhibition is free for members. General admission tickets with permanent collection access are $29 for adults. Senior tickets are $27, youth/student tickets are $15, and children (0-5 years old) receive free admission. Exhibition-only tickets are available for $14 or are free for Barnes members.

 

TOURS

Philadelphia Campus:

Daily Collection tour
About an hour
Specially trained docents lead you on an exciting voyage of discovery that features highlights of the collection, the history of the Foundation’s educational mission, as well as the thinking behind the extraordinary presentation of these masterpieces. This tour is invaluable for first-time visitors.
$45; members $22. Includes post-tour collection access. Check barnesfoundation.org for times. 

Famously Unorthodox: Barnes's wall ensembles tour
Thursdays in October, November, and December
2–3 pm
What makes the Barnes unlike any other art institution in the world? While most collections are grouped by chronology, style, or genre, art at the Barnes is arranged according to light, line, color, and space—principles that defy curatorial norms but follow the "universal language of art" according to Dr. Barnes. Dive into the mind of a self-made entrepreneur turned eccentric collector and deconstruct his "experiments in education" that posited art as a powerful tool for educational and social reform.
$45; members $22. Includes post-tour collection access.

Private docent tours
Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays
11 am–noon or 2–3 pm
Explore the Barnes collection with a specially trained docent, who will shape the tour around your group’s interests. Tours are for groups of six or less and do not include exhibitions. All tours are conducted in English.

Request tours at least two weeks in advance: reserve@barnesfoundation.org

$60 per person. Non-refundable payment collected one week in advance of scheduled tour. 

Premier tours
These intimate 90-minute tours with a specially trained docent take place when the collection is closed to the public and include private access to the Barnes Shop.
$60; members $30 

Totally Twisted: Unexpected tales from the Barnes collection
Tuesdays in October
4–5:30 pm
This tour is devoted to the strange, mysterious, and oddly curious art in the Barnes collection. From the shocking to the merely disquieting, you’ll see unsettling paintings by Rousseau and De Chirico, impossibly twisted scenes by the expressionist painter Soutine, and intense psychological portraits by Picasso. See this world-renowned collection in a whole new way.

The Circle of Montparnasse: Jewish artists in the Barnes collection
Tuesdays in November and December
4–5:30 pm
A core group of Jewish artists made Montparnasse on Paris’s Left Bank their home in the early 20th century. They came to Paris seeking artistic freedom in the city that was the beating heart of the Western art world. Many of these artists—including Chagall, Lipchitz, Modigliani, Pascin, and Soutine—also found favor with Dr. Barnes, and their works are prominent in his collection. This tour focuses on these and other Jewish artists important to the Barnes Foundation. 

A Closer Look
Tuesdays in November and December
4–5:30 pm  
Gain insight into masterpieces in the collection, spend time analyzing the Barnes’s ensemble arrangements, and learn about the educational beginnings of the Foundation.


Barnes Arboretum:

Guided tour of the Barnes Arboretum
Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays, June–October
1–2 pm
Get a glimpse into the lives of Dr. and Mrs. Barnes at their original estate and garden in Merion. Learn about the rare plants assembled by Mrs. Barnes over a span of 40 years and enjoy the collection of roses, peonies, lilacs, ferns, and numerous rare specimen trees.
$10; members $8


Walking Tours:

The Art of Architecture – Rittenhouse Square
September 12, 2015        
10 am - 12 pm
Instructor: Ross Mitchell 
How many times have you passed a remarkable example of architecture and not noticed? Slow down and join us for a walking tour of the unique buildings surrounding Rittenhouse Square in the heart of downtown Philadelphia. These buildings will be examined in terms of the aesthetics of each design and the building’s relationship to other nearby buildings. Philadelphia’s built environment offers a wide range of shapes and textures open to creative understanding. Explore the art in the architecture of these buildings and their ever evolving cultural legacy.

This tour will meet at the Guard House in the center of Rittenhouse Square at 9:45 am.
$20; members $18 


The Art of Sculpture - Ellen Phillips Samuel Memorial Sculpture Garden

September 19, 2015        
10 am - 12 pm
Instructor: David Nolan 
This discussion explores the unique sculpture environment of the Ellen Phillips Samuel Memorial Sculpture Garden along the banks of the Schuylkill River below Boat House Row. Developed over nearly thirty years, this sculptural landscape offers the viewer a wide range of works by both national and international artists presenting a variety of subjects and forms for consideration. This tour involves a minimum of walking. Parking is available below the Girard Avenue Bridge on Kelly Drive.

This tour will meet at 9:45 AM at the Lipchitz Sculpture in the Ellen Phillips Samuel Memorial Sculpture Garden located on Kelly Drive along the Schuylkill River, south of the Girard Avenue Bridge.
$20; members $18 


Center City sculpture walking tour
Saturday, October 3
9:45 am–noon
Guide: David Nolan, adjunct art instructor
Within a few blocks of Philadelphia’s City Hall, nestled between office buildings, are sculptures by several of the 20th century’s most prominent artists. Consider the relationship between art and the urban environment and the concept of public and private space on this walking tour. Highlights include Oldenburg’s Clothespin and Lipchitz’s Government of the People.

Tour leaves promptly at 10 am from Clothespin, outside Centre Square at 15th and Market Streets.
$20; members $18


Old City architecture walking tour
Saturday, October 10
9:45 am–noon
Guide: Ross Mitchell, director of Barnes-de Mazia education and outreach programs
How many times have you hurried by a remarkable example of Philadelphia architecture without noticing? Slow down and join us for a walking tour of select buildings in Old City. Examine the aesthetics of individual buildings and the neighborhood’s built environment as a whole.

Tour leaves promptly at 10 am from the southwest corner of 2nd and Chestnut Streets.
$20; members $18

 
Parkway sculpture walking tour
Saturday, October 17
9:45 am–noon
Guide: David Nolan, adjunct art instructor

This guided discussion of sculpture along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway examines two modes of public art: the memorial and the pure artwork. Consider the problem of the memorial, the question of representation vs. abstraction, and issues surrounding public space. Highlights include Moore’s Three Way Piece Number 1: Points and Rodin’s Thinker. This tour is a one-way walk down the Parkway, not a loop.

Tour leaves promptly at 10 am from the plaza in front of Café Cret at 16th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway.
$20; members $18 


Fountains of Philadelphia walking tour
Saturday, October 24
9:45 am–noon
Guide: David Nolan, adjunct art instructor
Public fountains have played an integral role in the growth and development of Philadelphia and they remain vital to the city’s vibrancy. On this walking tour, explore several of Philadelphia’s iconic public fountains, including the Washington Monument fountain, the Rodin Museum reflecting pool, and the Barnes Foundation water table.

Tour leaves promptly at 10 am from the Washington Monument fountain on Eakins Oval.
$20; members $18

 

PROGRAM CALENDAR: SEPTEMBER–DECEMBER 2015

FREE FIRST SUNDAY

The Barnes offers free admission and programming on the first Sunday of every month. Visitors are welcome to attend talks, performances, and hands-on activities throughout the day. Tickets are limited and cannot be reserved in advance; they are available on-site starting at 9 am. 

First Sundays, 10 am–5 pm; programming 1–4 pm

Free First Sunday: Traditions
Sunday, October 4
1–4 pm

Free First Sundays is generously presented by PECO.

Peco


Free tickets can be obtained on-site at the Barnes Foundation beginning at 9 am. Advance reservations are not available for Free First Sundays. This offer is limited to tickets for two adults and two children per transaction. Tickets are limited and available on a first come-first served basis. Tickets include access to the Collection gallery, special exhibition and any programming taking place that day. The Barnes Foundation and PECO look forward to welcoming you to Free First Sundays! Check the Barnes Foundation website for further details.

 

NIGHT LIFE AND PERFORMANCE

First Friday! Double the Heat with Dos y Mas
Friday, October 2
6–9 pm
Turn up the heat with an eclectic musical journey rooted in percussive traditions from all around the world. Celebrate Hispanic heritage with Dos y Mas (Two and More), an explosive ensemble comprised of two Cuban-born musicians: percussionist Arturo Stable and pianist Elio Villafranca. The evening also includes a short talk by Family and Community Programs Manager Lynn Berkowitz on ironwork surprises in Strength and Splendor: Wrought Iron from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen.
$25; members free                       

First Friday! is sponsored by Macy’s
Macy's


Early works by Trisha Brown, performed by the Trisha Brown Dance Company
Sunday, October 18
11 am–noon or 2–3 pm
Trisha Brown is a “master of simplicity with a dose of humor. The idea of a line, and the endless possibilities of how it could be assembled and dissolved, was a theme in [her early] work.” --Wendy Perron, the New York Times

Trisha Brown, a seminal choreographer of contemporary dance, deconstructed the dancing body to find new ways to harness the forces of gravity and momentum. Brown's pioneering early works (1968–1975) blur the boundaries between dance and installation art. The choreography was originally created for performance in lofts, art galleries, and outdoor spaces. The Trisha Brown Dance Company now performs these works for Philadelphia audiences for the first time. Offered as part of Trisha Brown: In the New Body, a retrospective of Brown’s work at Bryn Mawr College in collaboration with the Barnes Foundation and Pennsylvania Ballet. Takes place at the Barnes Foundation.

Free; reservations recommended.


Young Professionals night: Haute Metal
Friday, October 23
7–10 pm
High fashion meets luxury metals in our most brilliant Barnes bash yet. Celebrate Strength and Splendor: Wrought Iron from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen with young industry leaders and art aficionados at our eighth young professionals night. Also on view is Ellen Harvey: Metal Painting, a commissioned installation responding to the idiosyncratic placement of ironwork in Barnes ensembles. Both exhibitions highlight the 887 pieces of ironwork punctuating masterpieces at the Barnes.

Young professionals night tradition calls for dressing the theme: slip into something silver or pile on the metal and make a statement at Philly's brightest cultural hotspot.

Cocktails and light fare available for purchase. Includes after-hours access to the collection and exhibitions.*

$30; members $15; Contemporaries free

*Collection Gallery and exhibitions close at 9 pm. 

Young Professionals night: Haute Metal is sponsored by Macy’s
Macy's


Premieres at the Barnes: Concert by the Aizuri Quartet
Wednesday, October 28
6–9 pm
Don’t miss the culmination of the concert series featuring the Aizuri Quartet, in residence at the Curtis Institute and the Barnes Foundation in 2015. Experience the premieres of commissioned works by Curtis student and alumni composers, Rene Orth, Gabriella Smith (Curtis ’13), and Alyssa Weinberg, written in response to art in the Barnes collection. This evening of groundbreaking new work complements the launch of the Barnes Foundation’s fall 2015 exhibitions, Strength and Splendor: Wrought Iron from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen and Ellen Harvey: Metal Painting, on view September 19–January 4.
$25; members $20

 
First Friday! Swing Dance Social
Friday, November 6
6–9 pm
Bring your best Charleston or foxtrot to the Barnes as the Blackbird Society Orchestra whisks you away with the sounds of the roaring ’20s. Need to fine-tune your moves? A lesson by instructors from the Society Hill Dance Academy starts the evening off on the right foot. Includes a short talk by Senior Director of Conservation and Chief Conservator of Paintings Barbara Buckley on dance-themed paintings in the Barnes collection, including Henri Matisse’s mural, The Dance.
$25; members free 

First Friday! is sponsored by Macy’s
Macy's

 

Open Arts College Night at the Barnes Foundation
Friday, November 13
7–10 pm
Explore the Barnes collection alongside live music, performances, short stories, and a few surprises! Access to the Barnes collection and special exhibitions included. Complimentary refreshments and light fare including a cheese board, antipasti, and assorted bruschetta, will be offered.
Free. Entrance with valid college ID only. Preregistration encouraged.


Artful Tastings: A Curated Wine Tasting
November 20
6–9 pm
Vinocity’s Vicki Miller leads a tasting and discussion inspired by Strength and Splendor: Wrought Iron from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen. Exhibition access included.
$40; members $30*


First Friday! Bearded Barnes
Friday, December 4
6–9 pm
Philadelphia’s most provocative cabaret ensemble, the Bearded Ladies, adds an innovative twist on First Friday! with the premiere of Bearded Barnes, an original performance created in response to the Barnes collection, complete with period songs, contemporary song mash-ups, and costumes. Features Bearded Ladies favorites Heath Allen, Kristen Bailey, John Jarboe, Kate Raines, and Mary Tuomanen. Includes a short talk by Barnes Retail Operations Manager Julie Steiner—The Art of Absinthe: Hallucinations and the "Queen of Poisons" in the Barnes collection.
$25; members free 

First Friday! is sponsored by Macy’s
Macy's


Through Oceans of Time: Black Pearl Chamber Orchestra
Saturday, December 19
6–9 pm
Jeri Lynne Johnson, the founder and music director of the Black Pearl Chamber Orchestra, one of the country’s most diverse ensembles, leads the chamber group in a riveting, innovative performance that combines classical and contemporary music, including Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 and Stravinsky's Dumbarton Oaks. A performance by young musicians from the Settlement Music School's Trowbridge Chamber Orchestra opens the evening. Collection access included.
$30; members $24

Program
6–7 pm performance by the Trowbridge Chamber Orchestra 
7:30–8:15 pm performance by the Black Pearl Chamber Orchestra

 

FAMILY PROGRAMS

Fall Themes:

Hats Off to Picasso in October for a happy birthday nod complete with charming chapeau crafts.

November roars to life when Heavy Metal takes center stage in Strength and Splendor: Wrought Iron from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen.

December has everyone Sightseeing. Celebrate Matisse’s birthday—and his love of travel—as you wander the world through the collection.


ArtSee Activities: Hats Off
Sunday, October 4
1–4 pm
Imagination stations for family fun! Drop-in programs for all ages on Free First Sundays.
The hats have it! Wish Pablo Picasso a happy birthday by making a fantastic Harlequin hat, sketching a hat scene, and crafting a chapeau bag.
Free; drop-in 

Storytime Sunday
Sunday, October 4
2–4 pm
Arty books and stories about design and nature for children of all ages.
Free; drop-in 

ARTime Storytime: Chamelia
by Ethan Long
Thursday, October 8
10:30–11 am and 11:30 am–noon
Chamelia is the center of attention as she goes through life in her own special way. Your specialness will shine too with your fab patterns project.
Best for children aged 2–5 and their caregivers.
Free; reservations required. Book tickets online or call 215.278.7200.

ARTime Storytime: Maisy’s Rainbow Dream
by Lucy Cousins
Thursday, October 15
10:30–11 am and 11:30 am–noon
You’re invited to join Maisy’s dream journey through all the colors of the rainbow and then create a colorful craft.
Best for children aged 2–5 and their caregivers.
Free; reservations required. Book tickets online or call 215.278.7200.

Family Tour: ArtSee Highlights
Sunday, October 18
2:30–3:30 pm
See the sights in new ways on this interactive guided exploration of the collection gallery. Collection admission included; reservations required.
Adults $25; students/youth $15; adult members $13; student/youth members $7; children 5 and under free. Book tickets online or call 215.278.7200. 

ArtSee Activities: Heavy Metal
Sunday, November 1
1–4 pm
Imagination stations for family fun! Drop-in programs for all ages on Free First Sundays.
Fanciful animals, intricate locks, and dazzling signs are just some examples of the metalwork merriment you can create when you emboss your own metalwork crafts inspired by Strength and Splendor.
Free; drop-in

Storytime Sunday
Sunday, November 1
2­–4 pm
Arty books and stories about design and nature for children of all ages.
Free; drop-in 

Pajama Tour: Shiny Shapes
Friday, November 6
6–6:30 pm
Find the shiny ironwork shapes on this fun gallery hunt. For ages 2–5; wear your pajamas!
Included with collection admission; members free. Reservations required. Book tickets online or call 215.278.7200. 

ARTime Storytime: Little Blue Truck
by Alice Schertle
Thursday, November 12
10:30–11 am and 11:30 am–noon
With a few friendly beeps and a group of helping hands, the Little Blue Truck helps a dump truck learn a lesson or two. After the story, build your own blue truck.
Best for children aged 2–5 and their caregivers.
Free; reservations required. Book tickets online or call 215.278.7200. 

Family Tour: ArtSee Highlights
Sunday, November 15
2:30–3:30 pm
See the sights in new ways on this interactive guided exploration of the collection gallery. Collection admission included; reservations required.
Adults $25; students/youth $15; adult members $13; student/youth members $7; children 5 and under free. Book tickets online or call 215.278.7200. 

ARTime Storytime: Chugga-Chugga Choo-Choo
by Kevin Lewis
Thursday, November 19
10:30–11 am and 11:30 am–noon
A busy steam engine works hard to get the job done with a cast of colorful characters, and you’ll work hard too when you plan your own railroad.
Best for children aged 2–5 and their caregivers.
Free; reservations required. Book tickets online or call 215.278.7200. 

ArtSee Activities: Sightseeing
Sunday, December 6
1–4 pm
Imagination stations for family fun! Drop-in programs for all ages on Free First Sundays.
Tis the season for seeing the sights with collection travels to many interesting cultures and places. Draw with scissors as you cut out a Happy Birthday Matisse bag, create a travel poster of faraway lands, and design your own mode of transportation.
Free; drop-in 

Storytime Sunday
Sunday, December 6
2­–4 pm
Arty books and stories about design and nature for children of all ages.
Free; drop-in 

ARTime Storytime: Leaf Man
by Lois Ehlert
Thursday, December 10
10:30–11 am and 11:30 am–noon
Leaf Man is on the move and has to go where the wind blows. Watch what happens when you make a tumbling leaf project.
Best for children aged 2–5 and their caregivers.
Free; reservations required. Book tickets online or call 215.278.7200. 

ARTime Storytime: A Bird or Two: A Story about Henri Matisse
by Bijou Le Tord
Thursday, December 17
10:30–11 am and 11:30 am–noon
In the brilliant sun of southern France, Matisse painted everything in his bold and beautiful colors. Do the same in your travel journal.
Best for children aged 2–5 and their caregivers.
Free; reservations required. Book tickets online or call 215.278.7200. 

Family Tour: ArtSee Highlights
Sunday, December 20
2:30–3:30 pm
See the sights in new ways on this interactive guided exploration of the collection gallery. Collection admission included; reservations required.
Adults $25; students/youth $15; adult members $13; student/youth members $7; children 5 and under free. Book tickets online or call 215.278.7200. 

Keys to the Collection app
Turn your visit into a game: go on art adventures to find the gold key and unlock a special room where you create your own art gallery!
Free; pick up on-site or download to your Apple device.

Riddle of the Room audio tour
What is seen or suggested and gives you direction for great art detection? Find out in this award-winning interactive audio game.
Free; pick up on-site or download to your mobile device. 

Gallery Kits
Calling all art detectives! Visiting the Barnes is challenging fun as you solve the riddles, puzzles, and brain games posed on the art cards.

Metalwork Mystery
Pattern Puzzles
Riddle of the Room
Solving Still Life

Gallery kits are sponsored by Macy’s

 

TALKS

At the Crossroads of Dance and Visual Art: The Pioneering Choreography of Trisha Brown
Saturday, October 17
2–4 pm
This talk and panel discussion offers an overview of postmodern artist Trisha Brown’s 50-year career and her unprecedented choreography, which combines dance and visual art. Susan Rosenberg, scholar-in-residence at the Trisha Brown Dance Company, focuses on Brown’s most significant innovations and her work's fundamental artistic principles. Artist and curator Marissa Perel then leads a panel discussion on Brown’s legacy. Offered as part of Trisha Brown: In the New Body, a retrospective of Brown’s work at Bryn Mawr College in collaboration with the Barnes Foundation and Pennsylvania Ballet. Takes place at the Barnes Foundation.
Free; reservations recommended. 

Ironwork in the Barnes: Judith Dolkart in conversation with Ellen Harvey
Sunday, November 8
2–3:30 pm
Join Judith Dolkart, curator of Strength and Splendor: Wrought Iron from the Musée Le Secq des Tournelles, Rouen, for a talk about the unique practice of collecting ironwork and a conversation with Metal Painting artist Ellen Harvey.
$15; members $12

For a list offall 2015 Alumni and Student, Circles, Contemporaries, Corporate Council and Member programs, visit the programs page.

 

PUBLIC HOURS AND ADMISSION PRICES

Monday–Sunday: 10 am–5 pm. Closed Tuesdays. Open 6–9 pm on First Friday and select Friday evenings. Enjoy live music and collection access with a First Friday event ticket.

The Barnes Foundation will be open until 7 pm on Saturday, September 5th and 12th and until 6 pm on Sunday, September 13th and 20th.

View Extended Hours and Special Tours During the World Meeting of Families, September 2015

Tickets can be easily purchased on-site, online, or by calling 215-278-7200. Tickets are free to Members and children under the age of six accompanied by an adult. General admission prices are $22 adults, $20 seniors, $10 students and youth ages 6-18. Admission on the first Sunday each month is free through the generosity of PECO. Weekend pricing (Saturday and Sunday) is $25 for adults and $23 for seniors.

PARKING

The Barnes Foundation parking lot is accessible from Pennsylvania Avenue between 20th and 21st Streets. Parking is on a first-come, first-served basis and cannot be reserved in advance. Parking tickets can be validated at the Guest Services Center or in the lobby. A membership card must be shown at the time of validation to receive member parking rates.

Visitors: $12 for up to 4 hours; $2 each additional hour 
Members: $10 for up to 4 hours; $2 each additional hour

Valet Parking
Valet parking is available in the car and taxi drop-off area on 20th Street between the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and Pennsylvania Avenue. Valet services are offered during operating hours.

Visitors: $20 flat rate for duration of building hours
Members: $18 flat rate for duration of building hours

For additional information, visit the Barnes Foundation website.

DINING AT THE BARNES FOUNDATION

The Barnes offers two dining options for members and guests. Members receive a 10% discount.

Garden restaurant
The restaurant offers a seasonal à la carte menu of hot and cold dishes, salads, and desserts; a wine list featuring American and international wines; and specialty cocktails. On Friday nights, the menu includes light fare and an array of martinis. Outdoor seating is available seasonally.

Seating is first come, first served; the restaurant does not take reservations. All major credit cards are accepted.

The coffee bar
The coffee bar's casual menu features sandwiches, salads, snacks, desserts, cold beverages, and coffee. Located on the Lower Level. All major credit cards are accepted.

For hours and additional information, visit the Barnes Foundation website.

ABOUT THE BARNES FOUNDATION

The Barnes Foundation (barnesfoundation.org) was established by Albert C. Barnes in 1922 to “promote the advancement of education and the appreciation of the fine arts and horticulture.” The Barnes holds one of the world’s finest collections of post-impressionist and early modern paintings, with extensive works by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paul Cézanne, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Henri Rousseau, Amedeo Modigliani, Chaim Soutine, and Giorgio de Chirico; works by American masters Charles Demuth, William Glackens, Horace Pippin, and Maurice Prendergast; old master paintings; important examples of African sculpture; Native American ceramics, jewelry, and textiles; decorative arts and ironwork; and antiquities from the Mediterranean region and Asia. While most collections are grouped by chronology, style, or genre, art at the Barnes is arranged in ensembles structured according to light, line, color, and space—principles that Dr. Barnes called “the universal language of art.” The Foundation’s programs include First Fridays, young professionals nights, tours, tastings, and family programs, as well as Barnes-de Mazia Education Program courses and workshops. These programs advance the Foundation’s mission through progressive, experimental, and interdisciplinary teaching and learning. The Barnes Foundation is open Wednesday–Monday and tickets can be purchased on-site, online, or by calling 215.278.7200. Ticket prices and current hours are listed on our website

The Barnes Arboretum in Merion contains more than 2,000 varieties of trees and woody plants, many of them rare. Founded in the 1880s by Joseph Lapsley Wilson and expanded under the direction of Laura Leggett Barnes, the living collections include 40 state champion trees, a Chinese fringe tree (Chionanthus retusus), a dove tree (Davidia involucrata), a monkey-puzzle tree (Araucaria araucana), and a coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens). Other important plant collections include lilacs, peonies, stewartias, ferns, medicinal plants, hostas, and magnolias. The Horticulture Education Program has offered a comprehensive three-year certificate course in the botanical sciences, horticulture, garden aesthetics, and design since its establishment in 1940 by Mrs. Barnes. The arboretum also offers horticulture workshops and lectures, and is open to the public Friday – Sunday from May through November. Tickets can be purchased on-site, online, or by calling 215.278.7200. Ticket prices and current hours are listed on our website.

 

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For more information

Jan Rothschild, Senior Vice President for Communications
Deirdre Maher, Director of Communications 215.278.7160, press@barnesfoundation.org
Online Press Office: http://press.barnesfoundation.org

 

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