Plant Collection Highlights

Plant Collection Highlights

Franklinia alatamaha, Franklin tree
Franklinia alatamaha, Franklin tree

With more than 2,500 taxa of woody plants and perennials, the Barnes Arboretum is famous for its breadth and depth. The following plants and trees have been highlighted due to their rarity, unique qualities, or the diversity of a particular species within the Barnes's larger plant collection.

Rare Plants and Trees

The Barnes Arboretum contains a number of rare plants and trees. Learn more

Important Collections

The Barnes Arboretum's living collections include many important specimens. Learn more

Seasonal Bloom Calendar

Consult the Seasonal Bloom Calendar for a look at what's growing in the gardens throughout the year. Learn more

Highlights from the Arboretum

Lacebark Pine Tree

Launch Slideshow

Cornus kousa (Kousa dogwood) bark, with red Acer palmatum (Japanese maple) in background

Hamamelis × intermedia, ‘Jelena,’ hybrid witch-hazel in bloom January 2017

Corylopsis, winterhazel, grove in late March

Stewartia pseudocamellia (Japanese Stewartia) bark in winter

Trochodendron aralioides, Japanese wheel tree

Cladrastis kentukea, ‘Rosea,’ pink-flower yellowwood in late May

Pinus bungeana (lacebark pine), detail of bark

Sequoia sempervirens, Coast redwood (Pennsylvania state champion)

Davidia involucrata, dove tree, in early May

Fagus sylvatica 'Laciniata' (cut leaf European beech)

Arachniodes standishii, upside-down fern, late spring

Aesculus turbinata, Japanese horsechestnut

Magnolia sprengeri, ‘Diva,’ early spring

Magnolia × ‘Wada’s Memory,’ early spring

Magnolia collection, winter 2016

Magnolia collection, early April

Magnolia collection, autumn

Prinsepia sinensis, early spring

Viburnum macrocephalum, ‘Sterile’

Stewartia grove, autumn


Horticulture History

Learn more about the history of the Arboretum and Laura Barnes's role in helping these gardens grow. 


Volunteer

Whether you have a blossoming interest in botany or are simply looking to get your hands dirty, consider becoming an arboretum volunteer. Learn more