Barnes Foundation Publications

Barnes Foundation Publications

Books

 

American Paintings and Works on Paper in the Barnes Foundation

By Richard J. Wattenmaker

A comprehensive look at works by American artists within the Barnes Foundation's collection. Introductory essays reveal Dr. Barnes in his earliest days as a collector, as head of his own Foundation, and in the lifelong pursuit of artistic education as both student and teacher. Features works by Horace Pippin, Maurice and Charles Prendergast, Marsden Hartley, William Glackens, Charles Demuth, Milton Avery, and more.  

 

African Art in the Barnes Foundation: The Triumph of L'Art nègre and the Harlem Renaissance

By Christa Clarke, with contributions by Arthur P. Bourgeois, Nichole N. Bridges, Kevin D. Dumouchelle, Kate Ezra, Sarah Fee, Till Förster, Christraud M. Geary, Kathryn Wysocki Gunsch, Genevieve Hill-Thomas, Alisa LaGamma, Louis Perrois, Constantine Petridis, Mary Nooter Roberts, Monica Blackmun Visonà, and Susan M. Vogel

Albert C. Barnes’s African collection, which shaped Western taste for African art, is little known partly because the fame of his great French paintings eclipses other aspects of his collection for most visitors. African Art in the Barnes Foundation: The Triumph of L’Art nègre and the Harlem Renaissance by Christa Clarke is the first catalogue of the approximately 125 African objects—significant figural sculpture and masks, as well as utilitarian objects—that Barnes acquired between 1921 and 1924 from French dealer Paul Guillaume. Entries by fifteen prominent scholars provide information on the works. Clarke’s essay explains the collection’s significance, which transcends its considerable quality.

One of the first people in the United States to display African objects as art rather than ethnographic specimens, Barnes considered them to be the highest form of three-dimensional expression. His lifelong commitment to the advancement of African Americans and his vision of social justice through education led to his promotion of African art and his early involvement in the Harlem Renaissance. He placed African art at the heart of his foundation, linking African aesthetics to the Barnes’s educational mission. Even the program for the architectural decoration of the original Barnes Foundation buildings at Merion, Pennsylvania, declared the importance of African art. 

 

The Architecture of the Barnes Foundation

By Tod Williams and Billie Tsien

Architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien provide a behind-the-scenes look at the architectural evolution of the Barnes Foundation's new building, a refined modernist masterpiece in grounds designed by landscape architect Laurie Olin. The book presents photographs and drawings highlighting the building's sensitivity to the Foundation's original building at Merion, commissioned by Dr. Albert C. Barnes and designed by Paul Cret in the 1920s.

 

The Barnes Foundation: Masterworks

By Judith F. Dolkart, Martha Lucy, with contributions by Derek Gillman

An introductory essay by Deputy Director of Art and Archival Collections and Gund Family Chief Curator Dolkart traces Albert C. Barnes's collecting and the evolution of his education and display philosophies. Lavishly illustrated, the book provides new information on over 150 works in the collection, plus discussion of 21 distinctive wall ensembles.

 

The Barnes Foundation: Two Buildings, One Mission

By David B. Brownlee

This volume is devoted to the buildings by Paul Cret at Merion and by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects in Philadlephia, both designed to house the remarkable Barnes collection and its associated educational programs. The author shows how the buildings speak with one voice in reflecting the mission established by Albert C. Barnes. [Out of print]

 

Ellsworth Kelly: Sculpture on the Wall

By Judith F. Dolkart

This exhibition catalogue looks at the relationship between Kelly’s work and architecture, with a focus on the 65-foot Sculpture for a Large Wall (1956–1957), now in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

 

Matisse in the Barnes Foundation

Edited by Yve-Alain Bois

Matisse in the Barnes Foundation, edited by Yve-Alain Bois (Institute of Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey), with essays and entries by Karen K. Butler (independent scholar) and Claudine Grammont (Musée Matisse, Nice), and technical contributions by Barbara A. Buckley (Barnes Foundation), Jennifer Mass (Scientific Analysis of Fine Art, LLC), and Thomas Primeau (Baltimore Museum of Art), is a catalogue raisonné of the Foundation’s Matisse holdings. The result of a multi-year research project, it provides a first in-depth analysis of Barnes’s Matisse holdings from various perspectives.

The 59 works by Henri Matisse in the Barnes Foundation span his career and include Le Bonheur de vivre, also called The Joy of Life (1905–06), the manifesto painting that made his reputation; and The Dance (1932–33), the mural commissioned by Albert C. Barnes for the Foundation. This work revived the artist’s career, ushering in his cut-outs, and transformed the space for which he made it.

Butler’s essay discusses Barnes’s views on Matisse; Bois examines the place of The Dance in Matisse’s career; Grammont investigates Barnes’s reasons for collecting Matisse and the way he went about making his acquisitions. An essay by Buckley and Mass publishes their scientific research on the degradation of the pigments in Le Bonheur de vivre. An appendix presents the correspondence between Barnes and Matisse on The Dance.

Matisse in the Barnes Foundation received the 2016 Frances Smyth-Ravenel Prize for Excellence in Publication Design, the best-in-show award in the Museum Publications Design Competition of the American Alliance of Museums (AAM).

 

Renoir in the Barnes Foundation

By Martha Lucy and John House

Albert C. Barnes called Pierre-Auguste Renoir (18411919) a god and collected 181 works by him. Renoir in the Barnes Foundation publishes the complete Renoir holdings of the Foundation, tells the story of Barnes's obsession with the painter, and pins down the modernity of an artist whose attitude to the modern world was extremely conflicted.

 

William Glackens

Edited by Avis Berman, with contributions by Avis Berman, Elizabeth Thompson Colleary, Heather Campbell Coyle, Judith F. Dolkart, Alicia G. Longwell, Martha Lucy, Patricia Mears, Carol Troyen, and Emily C. Wood

William Glackens (18701938) was one of the liveliest and most influential American realist painters of the early twentieth century. This richly illustrated volume highlights the finest examples of Glackens's work over the course of his career, including paintings previously unknown to the general public; a revelatory new monograph, William Glackens accompanies the first major retrospective of his work in almost fifty years.

 

Yinka Shonibare MBE: Magic Ladders

By Judith F. Dolkart

Shonibare matches the opulent beauty of his art with erudition and wit as he explores identity, opportunity, and colonialism, reflected especially in his commentary on education and social mobility, themes also highly relevant to Dr. Barnes. This catalogue accompanies the exhibition of the same name, running January 24April 21, 2014, and including a specially commissioned work.

 


 

Media

 

A Passion for Art (CD)

Unprecedented access to the Barnes's world-famous collection. Visit each gallery, zoom in on selected works for details about the painting and the artist, uncover fascinating historical documents from the Foundation's archives, create your own slideshows, and listen to four different audio tours of the collection.

 

The Collector (DVD)

This HBO documentary follows Dr. Albert C. Barnes from his humble Philadelphia beginnings to his breakthrough medical discovery, and onto his whirlwind collecting of art and the formation of his legendary educational foundation.

 

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