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Botticelli and Renaissance Florence

Online / Art in Context

Wednesdays, November 9 – December 7, 1 – 2:30pm

#SeeingtheBarnes

Sandro Botticelli. Pallas and the Centaur (detail), c. 1482. Uffizi Gallery, Florence

$220; members $198
(4 classes; no class on November 23)

About the Class

The flourishing artistic culture of Renaissance Florence is among the most celebrated moments in art history, and Sandro Botticelli was at the center of it. This special course, taught by an international team of Renaissance experts, explores the themes of the exhibition Botticelli and Renaissance Florence: Masterworks from the Uffizi, on view at the Minneapolis Institute of Art this fall. This is a rare opportunity to learn about Botticelli’s remarkable artistic innovations within the broader history of Renaissance art directly from curators, conservators, and scholars.

Each class focuses on a different theme: art in the Renaissance home; Botticelli’s contemporaries Perugino and Signorelli; Botticelli’s depiction of garments; and a behind-the-scenes look at Mia’s exhibition.

The class is online-only. More about online classes.

 

Sandro Botticelli. Pallas and the Centaur, c. 1482. Uffizi Gallery, Florence

Instructors

Roberta Bartoli

Bartoli is an art history professor at Ca' Foscari University of Venice, Italy. She previously taught art history at the University of Minnesota. She is member of the scientific board of the Master in Cultural Diplomacy program at the Università Cattolica, Milan, and associate scholar at the Kunsthistorisches Institut–Max Planck Institut in Florence. She is a member of the Accademia delle Arti del Disegno, Florence, and has curated major exhibitions and published widely on Italian Renaissance art.

Rebekah Compton

Compton is associate professor of Renaissance and baroque art history at the College of Charleston, South Carolina. She is a recipient of a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at Columbia University and the Rush H. Kress Fellowship at the Villa I Tatti, Florence, the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies. Her book Venus and the Arts of Love in Renaissance Florence was published with Cambridge University Press in 2021.

Cecilia Frosinini

Frosinini is an art historian specializing in 15th-century art. She directed the painting and drawing conservation department at the Opificio delle Pietre Dure in Florence for many decades. She co-curated the upcoming Mia exhibition Botticelli and Renaissance Florence: Masterworks from the Uffizi and co-edited the accompanying catalogue.

Tom Henry

Henry is Emeritus Professor of History of Art at the University of Kent. His monographic study The Life and Art of Luca Signorelli was published by Yale University Press in 2012, and he also publishes on Perugino and other central Italian artists. He has curated exhibitions of Italian Renaissance art across the world, including Raphael at the National Gallery, London (2022), and Signorelli 500, which opens in Cortona, Italy, in April 2023.

Rachel McGarry

McGarry is the Elizabeth MacMillan Chair of European Art and Curator of European Paintings and Works on Paper at the Minneapolis Institute of Art. She earned her MA and PhD from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, specializing in Italian Renaissance and baroque art. McGarry co-curated the upcoming Mia exhibition Botticelli and Renaissance Florence: Masterworks from the Uffizi and co-edited the accompanying catalogue.

Partner

This class is offered in partnership with the Minneapolis Institute of Art.

Home to more than 90,000 works of art representing 5,000 years of world history, the Minneapolis Institute of Art (Mia) inspires wonder, spurs creativity, and nourishes the imagination. With extraordinary exhibitions and one of the finest art collections in the country—from all corners of the globe, and from ancient to contemporary—Mia links the past to the present, enables global conversations, and offers an exceptional setting for inspiration.

Art in Context

Art in Context courses connect works of art to history: What was happening politically, socially, and culturally at the time a piece was made? How did these circumstances shape the artist’s formal choices?