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Mondays, April 3 – April 24, 1 – 3pm

#SeeingtheBarnes

Georgia O’Keeffe. Radiator Building—Night, New York (detail), 1927. Alfred Stieglitz Collection, co-owned by Fisk University, Nashville, TN, and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, AR. Photography by Edward C. Robison III. © Georgia O'Keeffe Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

$220; members $198
(4 classes)

About the Class

Before 1837, visual experience of the world was mediated through painting, illustration, and sculpture. Painters, especially, had an essential role in society to acquire both skill and nuanced imagination to create likenesses, memorialize historical events, and render the world as it appeared. The scientific invention of photography mimicked the lens of the human eye, ushering us into modernity. As a medium, it was immediate, democratic, and seemed to present unassailable truth. It also had an enormous impact on painting. This class will explore how painting was irrevocably changed by photography, but also how early photography mimicked some of the conventions of painting. We will also question photography’s claim to present unassailable truth.

The class is online-only. More about online classes.

This course will:

  • Increase your understanding of art-related concepts.
  • Increase the ways you think critically about art.
  • Improve your ability to communicate about art.
  • Deepen your appreciation for cultures and histories outside your own.
 

Georgia O’Keeffe. Radiator Building—Night, New York, 1927. Alfred Stieglitz Collection, co-owned by Fisk University, Nashville, TN, and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, AR. Photography by Edward C. Robison III. © Georgia O'Keeffe Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Instructor

Michael Williamson

A member of the Barnes faculty, Williamson studied at Yale University and the Milton Avery Graduate School of Bard College. He taught art history and studio art for nearly 30 years at Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia. Williamson has an active art practice and has shown his paintings locally.

Art in Context

Art in Context courses connect works of art to history: What was happening politically, socially, and culturally at the time a piece was made? How did these circumstances shape the artist’s formal choices?

“[The] professor was highly engaging, facilitated excellent discussions, and [was] very knowledgeable. I learned a lot about teaching art history from watching her.” Course: Matisse and Picasso with Martha Lucy

“Every single second of the course was a productive, valuable, and interesting use of my time. The instructor's enthusiasm and reference to outside resources sparked a greater interest in me as a learner and resulted in me exploring even more on my own. I couldn't have enjoyed the experience more.” Course: Salvador Dalí: Surrealism and Beyond with Jonathan Wallis

“I am not an artist and prior to this course I had not thought about what an artist might be 'thinking,' as opposed to 'feeling.' I loved this course and plan to immerse myself in color theory.” Course: Visualizing Memory with Lucas Kelly

“This course is equal to or exceeds art history courses I have taken at several major universities in terms of syllabus and quality of instruction.” Course: The School of Paris with Joseph Tokumasu Field