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Online Class: Mexican Muralism

Online / Art in Context

Thursdays, October 7 – October 28, 10am – 12pm

#SeeingtheBarnes

Diego Rivera. Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in the Alameda Park (detail), 1947-48. © 2021 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Image © Schalkwijk / Art Resource, NY

$220; members $198
(4 classes)

Art in Context courses connect works of art to history: What was happening politically, socially, and culturally at the time a piece was made? How did these circumstances shape the artist’s formal choices?

About the Class

Spurred by the revolution, Mexican artists engaged in an ambitious mural-making program, painting the nation’s walls to educate the public about Mexico’s history and cultivate a national identity. This course examines the origins and development of the Mexican muralist movement in the 20th century. While we will focus on the murals painted by “los tres grandes”—Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros—we will also explore the murals they painted in the United States in the 1930s, as well as other artists associated with the movement.

More about online classes.

 

Diego Rivera. Dream of a Sunday Afternoon in the Alameda Park, 1947-48. © 2021 Banco de México Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Image © Schalkwijk / Art Resource, NY

Instructor

Mey-Yen Moriuchi

Moriuchi is associate professor of art history at La Salle University, where she specializes in cultural encounters and representations of racial, social, and national identities in Latin American art from the 18th to 20th century. She received her BA in art history and international relations from the University of Pennsylvania and her MA and PhD in the history of art from Bryn Mawr College. She is the author of Mexican Costumbrismo: Race, Society, and Identity in Nineteenth-Century Art (Penn State University Press; 2018).